SaaStr Podcast #411 with Slack Chief Product Officer Tamar Yehoshua

Ep. 411: Tamar Yehoshua is the Chief Product Officer @ Slack, the company providing a place where people get work done, together. Prior to their direct listing in June 2019, Slack raised over $1.3Bn from the likes of Accel, Thrive, Softbank, Kleiner, IVP, T Rowe, GV, and a16z to name a few. As for Tamar, previously, Tamar was a Vice President at Google, holding product and engineering leadership roles on Google’s most important products, including Search, Identity, and Privacy. Prior to that, she was the Vice President of Advertising Technologies at Amazon’s A9. If that was not enough Tamar is also on the board of 2 public companies in the form of Yext and ServiceNow.

In Today’s Episode We Discuss:

How Tamar made her way from Google and Amazon into the world of bottoms up SaaS with one of the leading companies of our generation, Slack. What were Tamar’s biggest takeaways from her time with Amazon and Google? How did Jeff Bezos’ approach to “the customer” impact Tamar’s operating mindset? How does Tamar analyze customer responses to product changes? How important a role does the press play in customer’s responses?

How does Tamar think about effective product design today? How does Tamar structure the customer development process? What questions does she ask? What is she looking for? Where do many people go wrong with customer discovery? What channels can teams put in place to have this real-time dialogue with their customers?

How would Tamar describe her management philosophy today? What have been some of Tamar’s biggest lessons on giving effective feedback? How should it be structured? When should it be given? To what extent does Tamar agree with “radical candor”? Where do many go wrong in giving their feedback?

 

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Jason Lemkin
SaaStr
Harry Stebbings
Slack

Below, we’ve shared the transcript of Harry’s interview with Tamar.

Harry Stebbings:

We are back, and this is the official SaaStr podcast with me, Harry Stebbings, and what an episode we have in store for you today with Tamar Yehoshua, chief product officer at Slack. The company providing a place where people get work done together. Prior to that direct listing in 2019, Slack raised over $1.3 billion from some of the best, including Accel, Thrive, Softbank, Kleiner, IVP, T Rowe, GV, and Andreessen, to name a few. As for Tamar, previously, Tamar was a vice-president at Google, holding product and engineering roles on Google’s most important products, including search, identity, and privacy. Prior to that, she was the vice president of advertising technologies at Amazon’s A9, and if that wasn’t enough, Tamar is also on the board of two public companies in the form of Yext and ServiceNow.

Harry Stebbings:

I do also want to say a huge thank you to Paul Rosania at Balsa and April Underwood for some amazing question suggestions today. I really did so appreciate that. But that’s more than enough for me. So now I’m very excited to welcome Tamar Yehoshua, chief product officer at Slack.

Harry Stebbings:

Tamar, it is so great to have you on the show. I’ve heard so many great things from April Underwood, from Paul Rosania. So thank you so much for joining me today.

Tamar Yehoshua:

Thank you for having me. I’ve heard lots of your episodes before and it’s really exciting to be here.

Harry Stebbings:

That is very kind of you and what a start to the show, but I would love to add a little bit of context. So let’s start at the beginning and in terms of your entrance into the world of SaaS, how did you make your way into the world of SaaS and how did you come to lead the game-changing product team that is in place at Slack?

Tamar Yehoshua:

Wow, it’s been an interesting road. I’ve been in tech for a very long time and I came to the Valley to work for Intel, where I was working on CAD tools. I was a C++ developer working on electromigration on a full chip. So very far away from the SaaS world and then 1999 happened and I said, there’s this whole internet thing and I need to get on board. So I left Intel and went to a 10 person startup, and it was a B2B e-commerce company, one of those ones that did the whole rise and fall, and I had hired a lot of people and then I had to lay off a lot of people, went to another startup and then I said, okay, back to a big company, went to Amazon, was there for six years and had a great experience at Amazon. Then went to Google and then didn’t expect to end up in enterprise software, but Slack came calling and it was an opportunity I just could not pass up.

Harry Stebbings:

And I mean, what an incredible opportunity it is with Slack. I do have to ask on the Google and Amazon element, eight years and six years respectively at each, how did seeing that incredible hypergrowth impact your operating mindset today, do you think?

Tamar Yehoshua:

I feel like I was so lucky to be at both those companies when I was. So when I was at Amazon, it was a lot smaller than it is today, and I was really lucky to have the opportunity to actually interact with Bezos on many occasions, and there are so many things that I learned from him. He would always say things like take the long view. Don’t build me two products, be customer obsessed, not customer aware, but I think the biggest management lesson I took away from Amazon and Bezos was to always put the customer first. So anything that we brought to him, why is this good for the customer? And I remember in some reviews with Bezos, when he would pull out a screenshot, then you knew you were in trouble because he was going to show you something on the page on Amazon that he didn’t like, that he didn’t think was good for customers.

Tamar Yehoshua:

So that, I’ve taken with me everywhere I’ve gone since Amazon, and then most of my career at Google, I was in the search team and it’s all about scale and complexity and it can be deceiving. Anytime I would hire a new product manager into my team, I would tell them you use search all the time. You think you understand search. You don’t. It is way more complex than you think, and I would tell them that it takes a lot to get a change out. You’re going to think there’s a lot of process, but even if you introduce the smallest bug, it impacts a million people so that process is necessary. So for example, every week we would have a weekly search quality review and any change that was proposed to go out was dissected and analyzed from every direction. So the thing that I really took away from those years at Google was if you have a product that’s used by a billion people, you need a lot of checks and balances in place.

Harry Stebbings:

Totally with you in terms of the checks and balances. Can I ask you, this is off schedule, but I’m intrigued. When you have a product that touches as many people as Google does or as Slack does today, do you get nervous before big product changes and releases?

Tamar Yehoshua:

Of course. You really think about it from every angle and you have to build up to it in your career and you understand at this point, I can pretty much predict what are going to be the responses, what’s the press, what’s the tenured users, what are the new users, and if you can’t, you’re doing something wrong, but you really have to understand that it is complex and there will never be a change that everyone loves, and you just have to make sure that you understand why it is good for the customers that you did this.

Harry Stebbings:

Have you found that press cycles normally align in the way that they are sentimented, and what I mean by that is if there’s a negative press cycle around a product change, it generally is right and it doesn’t end up being the right decision or actually, that kind of inversely correlated and the product releases turn out to be actually the most transformational?

Tamar Yehoshua:

I don’t think that I could give a blanket statement on that because I would say it depends. Sometimes the press is really following the sentiment of users and sometimes the press is following the sentiment of the press, and so especially for Google, it became more complicated because of the impact on the news industry of the changes that Google may or may not make, and so I didn’t always represent what an end user was looking for. One thing that’s a little bit unique in Slack and really interesting is that the press are some of our biggest users and the press loves Slack. So they happen to be more like their reaction is very aligned to a tenured user.

Harry Stebbings:

I mean, it’s fascinating to hear and I totally see in terms of the press’ usage of Slack. I’ve seen it firsthand. I do want to touch on a couple of elements. So you mentioned management lessons there from Google and Amazon, and I’m a big one for philosophies and touching on kind of two with you, management and design. If we do management first, how, and it’s a vague one so I apologize for this, but how would you describe your management philosophy today, do you think?

Tamar Yehoshua:

I’m a very direct person and everyone in my team, that’s one of the things that they will tell me and I believe in clarity and transparency, and clarity is far reaching. You need to have a clarity of your mission, a clarity of your strategy. Your organization needs to be clear to everyone in it. Your expectations of your employees need to be clear. So it’s really important that all across everything that you do, there is that clarity and for example, back to Bezos, he was very clear on his customer centricity. Everyone knew that when you go into a review with Bezos, he’s going to ask you, why is this good for your customers, and so that clarity is incredibly empowering for an organization and it makes sure that people are not pulled in different directions, and then you combine that clarity with transparency.

Tamar Yehoshua:

You need to give people transparency into what’s happening in the business so that they have access to information they need to make the right decisions, and now I’m going to do a shameless plug for Slack, which I think is very helpful in transparency. So for example, at Slack, we have public channels for every company level objective and so anybody in the company can find the information they need about the objectives, what are the latest metrics, et cetera, and channels are really a great way of enabling transparency in everything that you do. So one other example is I have weekly product reviews. The people in the review, it’s a pretty limited audience of who’s in the review, but the decks and the notes are in a public channel. So anybody, anybody in my organization or anywhere in the company can see the notes.

Harry Stebbings:

I’m really intrigued. You mentioned that kind of the product reviews. In terms of who’s in that, often I have this question from founders is you don’t want to bring everyone in and just have this kind of free for all, but you don’t want to make it a too concentrated group of people. How do you think about and advise on the right people to bring into the product reviews and how you structure that?

Tamar Yehoshua:

This is a perennial question because people feel left out if they’re not included and they want to be there. The rule that I try and use is no bystanders. The people who are in the meeting should be the people who are going to be contributing to the conversation because they can answer questions or they can give input that you need in order to make a decision, but again, I believe in full transparency so anybody should have access to what you’re discussing, unless of course it’s a highly sensitive topic, which sometimes happens. Most of the time in most of these reviews, you can make the notes public and that I think is the right balance of trying to keep it small, especially in this Zoom world where you really don’t want 20, 30 people on a Zoom call that don’t necessarily need to be there.

Harry Stebbings:

Totally with you and I love that no bystanders. In terms of the kind of transparency element, and I’m sorry for getting off schedule so much here, but I’m too interested. I’m always questioning whether when it comes to feedback, immediate kind of transparent feedback is right, or is it right to pick and choose your moment? Sometimes, it can not be the time or the place. How do you think by that, immediate, radical candor versus more strategically doing it over time?

Tamar Yehoshua:

So it depends what the feedback is. I think feedback needs to be immediate for some instances, like if I was in a presentation with somebody and I really don’t think they hit the right note for that presentation, I should tell them immediately afterwards when it’s fresh in their mind and say, “Hey, you could have done this differently. You shouldn’t have spent so much time here. I really needed a little bit more information on this.”

Tamar Yehoshua:

So I believe that the feedback should be immediate when it’s fresh and remembered, but if it’s more strategic feedback, you need to take a step back and really think about how you’re delivering it because how you deliver the feedback is almost as important as what the feedback is so that you make sure that somebody internalizes it, and the last point I’ll make on that is that I think you have to be careful not to overload people with feedback. Don’t give feedback on every small little thing. Be very strategic and give feedback on the biggest things that you think are important that somebody pay attention to.

Harry Stebbings:

It’s so interesting you said there about, it’s the how in the way that you deliver the feedback. I am interested on that. What is the right way to be assertive and kind of authoritative, but also kind of empathetic and understanding. How do you think about the right how?

Tamar Yehoshua:

I think you have to be clear and concise. People make a mistake when they’re giving feedback of talking too much and saying too many platitudes and unnecessary things, and then your message gets lost. You have to be very specific. When I see you doing this, here’s what I need. I need you to deliver this and then stop talking. So deliver it and stop and wait for the other person to absorb. People fill in the gap and just keep talking.

Harry Stebbings:

Yeah, no, I agree. I think you got to kind of learn to be comfortable in the silence, so to speak. I do have to ask, switching from kind of management philosophies, that core design philosophies. When it comes to design, how do you think about your design philosophy today?

Tamar Yehoshua:

Coming to Slack has really made a big impact on my design philosophy because I’ve learned so much from Stewart, the co-founder and CEO of Slack, in how he approaches product design. He’s incredibly consistent with his approach to design and he, like Bezos, is always putting the customer first. One thing that Stewart likes to talk about is owner’s delusion. So owner’s delusion is very common when people think that their customers care more about the product than they really do. Their customers care about getting their own work done or what’s going on in their personal life. They don’t want to spend all their time figuring out your product. So you have to make sure that you don’t fall into that trap of thinking you’re more important than you are as the product designer, and so one of the things that we do at Slack is we try and always put ourselves in the shoes of the customers.

Tamar Yehoshua:

And this might sound a bit hokey, but it makes a difference if you try and wear a specific hat. So we do something called complaint storms, and we pretend we’re a new user. So for example, pretend that your boss came to you. You’d never heard of Slack and they said, I heard about this thing called Slack. Can you go investigate it, and you had a bad day, or you’re really hungry. You want to go to lunch and you really don’t want to investigate this new tool, but okay, your boss told you, you had to. Now you open up the website. Now that’s the mindset of the person who opened up your website.

Tamar Yehoshua:

What are they thinking, and then you step through as a team with the designers, engineers, product managers, people from marketing, customer support. You step through that flow as if you were that person and then everybody is documenting the things that they see that are broken, and it’s amazing what you see about a product that you use every day when you put on a different hat. So it might sound really simple to always see things from the customer perspective, but it’s actually deceptively hard to achieve.

Harry Stebbings:

I totally see it as deceptively hard to achieve. The thing that’s striking to me there is marketing and sales and the input that is so valuable from them into the product feedback loop. How do you think about creating this incredibly tight product feedback loop and feedback mechanism between product and then marketing and sales?

Tamar Yehoshua:

We have a lot of ways that we get feedback from our customers and some of it is obviously we have a great customer support team and a great customer success team. We do what’s called customer advisory boards, where we bring our champions together with representatives from marketing and sales. We get feedback on Twitter. We get feedback from customer support, but that we actually have a very tight loop with our customers. It’s a little bit unique that we started in the last year. So again, shameless plug for Slack. We use Slack Connect, which is shared channels with our champions and customers.

Tamar Yehoshua:

So we have a set of Slack champions, around 30 people from many, many different companies, and when we have a new release of some software, we actually have the engineers, designers, and PMs in a shared channel with our customers. This has been so unique in how we develop our software. We did it for the first time when we were launching a major revision to our UI, and we saw the customers talking to each other about it and we saw the conversations with the engineers, designers, and PMs with the customers, and it was just so interesting and the feedback loop was so much tighter than I’ve ever seen in any other way of gathering feedback from customers.

Harry Stebbings:

And it’s also so valuable in terms of, from a marketing perspective, understanding the messaging, the words they use to describe it and how it resonates. So I absolutely love that in terms of that kind of tight, cohesive group. If we distill that design philosophy down a little bit then to product design and development, how do you think of effective product development today?

Tamar Yehoshua:

So the way that I look at product development is you want to get to product market fit in the fastest way possible, and whether that’s for the entire product or whether that’s for a feature. So you want to iterate quickly with your customers. We have another principle at Slack that we call prototype the path because if I show you a mock up and you’re a customer, even internally within the company, it’s very hard to know how something’s going to work until you feel it and you really try it. So this is ingrained into our product development cycle and as I had mentioned, our major new UI revision that we did.

Tamar Yehoshua:

When we did that, we were prototyping and turning around prototypes every day. So there’s a new design. We would prototype it, we would try it out. Then we would iterate. This is throw away code and it’s very important that it’s throw away code. Engineers will sometimes say, but then it’s going to take longer if we’re writing code and throwing it away, but over and over, we’ve seen you get to the end result faster and you get there because you’re iterating until you find the right balance of what you need to develop and then you productize it.

Harry Stebbings:

Can I ask in terms of that very tight iteration process, I’m so intrigued. How do you think about giving it enough time to get enough data to really understand usage and behavior patterns towards it versus too long where I’d actually, you’ve kind of disincented a number of users from enjoying it? How do you think about that, enough data versus too long?

Tamar Yehoshua:

So this is part of the art of being a product manager, and one of the things we say at Slack is we’re data informed, but not data-driven. You have to have an instinct. You have to have an instinct of what is right for your customers and for your product. You need to measure everything. So you have to understand the impact, but you can’t be driven purely by the measurement.

Harry Stebbings:

Totally with you in terms of being driven purely by the measurement. In terms of the product dev process, working hand in hand with customers, and we spoke there about the channels themselves, but specifically, how does your team structure their engagement with customers, and a real one for me is like, what are the best questions to fully understand customer needs, wants, and product designs?

Tamar Yehoshua:

We’re big believers in the jobs to be done framework, that you don’t ask a customer what do you think of this feature or product, et cetera. You really try and understand what they’re tying to accomplish in their day-to-day work and then what job are they hiring us to do? So you have to be very careful how you phrase things so that you really get in front of what they want to achieve and how you can actually help them achieve their business needs. Again, it’s not about our product. It’s about them achieving what they want to achieve. So we have a lot of different tracks that we use, where we have an amazing user research team, and so sometimes you really do need feedback on a feature and you want to see how somebody uses it, but more importantly, you want to talk to your customers about the most important things impeding them from getting their work done.

Harry Stebbings:

I think for me, the most challenging thing, and again, sorry for being off schedule here, but the beauty of Slack in many ways, it’s just how incredibly horizontal it is, the product across so many different industries, but then I’m sure you also get incredibly verticalized feedback on products and product requirements and wants. How do you think about that challenge of being so horizontal with very verticalized feedback coming in?

Tamar Yehoshua:

So we want to make sure that our product works for everyone, small companies, large companies, any kind of role or position, and yes, sometimes we get feedback that may be directed towards one specific thing, but if we look at it, we want to make sure that everything we’re doing will serve as many customers as possible, and we do look at it differently for our self-service funnel of people who are onboarding in small companies versus large enterprises, and we need to make sure that we meet the needs of our large enterprises. So that is very directed and that is very intentional that we meet all the security and compliance needs of those large customers, but we don’t build in vertical solutions for specific roles. We try and let our platform do that. So what our platform does, it allows integration with any third party tool or the building of custom apps for specific roles and needs, and that’s where we think we add another layer of value for our customers.

Harry Stebbings:

Totally with you in terms of that platform plan, how that kind of unlocks from a vertical by vertical standpoint. In terms of the customer base that you serve, and as you said there, from very early stage to large enterprises, a big question is kind of product [inaudible 00:21:02] and simplicity. How do you think about retaining that core product simplicity while also adding product complexity? How do you think about that inherent seeming paradox?

Tamar Yehoshua:

That is a great question and it’s a trap that many people fall into. Oh, we need to add this feature, and then you just, it’s death by a thousand cuts and then in addition to that, every product manager who works on a feature, their feature is the most important one and it needs to be front and center. So then you end up with a mess of lots of bells and whistles all over the place, and it’s very cluttered. When we did our revision of our UI earlier this year, one of the reasons was because of that, that our UI had gotten too cluttered and messy. So what we did is in our prototyping, we removed everything in our first prototype and put it all behind one menu and said, how do we simplify everything, and then we slowly walked it back to say what really needed to be out front and center, and then you have to figure out how do you, on a regular basis, maintain this and not keep introducing new complexity?

Tamar Yehoshua:

So again, back to our product principles, one of our principles is don’t make me think. You don’t want to put the complexity in front of the customer. So anytime we have a new feature launching, we think, is this adding too much complexity? Do people have to think too hard because they have too many options? Another trap that people fall into is you don’t want people to have too many clicks or things behind a menu or a button, but that’s actually okay as long as people know how to find it or they know how to comprehend what to do next. So that’s really our principle that we try and help guide us, the don’t make our users feel stupid and don’t make them think too hard so that it’s obvious, and we evaluate anything new we do under that lens.

Harry Stebbings:

Totally with you in terms of that lens and I love that in terms of don’t make me think. I think what’s so fascinating today, especially in this time, is just how fundamentally different obviously people are working today. Obviously COVID is hit. The world is now more reliant on Slack than it even was before, if I can believe I’m saying that, but how do you think this fundamentally changed world has changed the way that people interact on the platform and how have you seen that? I’m really interested by that one.

Tamar Yehoshua:

So immediately when people went distributed, as I’m sure you’re aware, we saw a lot of new people turning to Slack and we saw a lot of our existing customers expanding at the drop of a hat. So they went wall to wall within 72 hours, which was kind of unheard of, and at first, our first reaction was how do we help all these customers? How do we help all these new people coming to Slack, and so we did a bunch of customer consults. We got the whole company involved. We offered free 20 minute consults to anyone of how to use Slack to work remotely, and that was really helpful for us to understand what people needed.

Tamar Yehoshua:

And what we see is that the real transformation is that Slack went from being a communication tool to being a replacement for the physical office, and people come to Slack and view it as their new digital headquarters. So while this has always been our long-term vision, this happened much faster and if you think about the physical office, a physical office, you would walk around, you would have conversations, you’d be by the coffee machine or in a hallway after a meeting. All of these conversations have now moved to Slack.

Harry Stebbings:

Okay. So how does that, because that’s such a seismic shift, how does that change your priorities and roadmaps specifically when it comes to product?

Tamar Yehoshua:

So we absolutely had to be flexible with our roadmap once COVID hit, and a lot of it was we were already working a lot on our new user experience and making sure that things were easy to understand, but we really shifted a lot of resources to make that go faster because there were so many people who are less familiar with Slack turning to Slack that we wanted to make it as simple and as seamless as possible. So basically, we just speed it up, things that we were doing. It was really interesting to see as we were going remote and the world was going remote at the same time, we didn’t miss a beat. We actually started going faster because it was so galvanizing.

Harry Stebbings:

I totally agree with you. Can I ask from a decision-making process standpoint, you moved with such agility and speed. How does the decision-making structure look to enable you to move so fast?

Tamar Yehoshua:

Once again, Slack the product really helps. We saw once we went remote a lot, it’s Slack the company, we moved much more to Slack the product and our message content went up by 30% the first week, and so we just moved a lot of that conversation into channels wherever we could so that we had the transparency that we needed, and we took some meetings that used to be in person meetings with 30, 40 people and what we did is we moved the conversation in channel and then only had the meeting when it was absolutely necessary because we couldn’t come to a conclusion in channel.

Harry Stebbings:

Gotcha. Okay. No, that makes total sense and I love the channel centricity there. So that’s kind of the backward looking. In terms of forward-looking, how do you think about projecting out into the future? When we look at the seismic shift obviously to remote work, how does that impact the future of product development and how you think about that moving forward?

Tamar Yehoshua:

So I don’t think we’re going back to how things were pre-pandemic. I think people have realized that they can close deals without getting on a plane, that you can hold a successful user conference virtually. I think that we’re never going fully back to how we were and recently at Slack, we did a survey of knowledge workers and we found that people actually like working remotely, and 72% of people said that they want a hybrid remote work office model. So it’s really been interesting to see that people like it, but there are big challenges. There’s challenges of feelings of isolation and loneliness, challenges of building relationships.

Tamar Yehoshua:

And so we’re going to have to figure out how we fix those challenges while keeping the benefits and what see is, I see that there’s a whole new set of products that are coming on the market. I’m sure you see this in your world as a VC, and these products are there to help people communicate and feel connected. So we’re going to see a lot more of those products that will help in communication, but I don’t think we’re going to see any fundamental difference in product development. I think we’re going to see new tools to enable the distributed working.

Harry Stebbings:

Totally with you in that. I do have to ask, do you view those tools as competitive or are they kind of ancillary and additional?

Tamar Yehoshua:

We view ourselves as an open platform and we integrate into everything and anybody is welcome to integrate into Slack. We see it all as complimentary. For example, a tool that I’ve been using a lot internally is Loom. Instead of having a meeting and using a whiteboard, you give product feedback through a Loom video and Loom is integrated into Slack, which makes it super easy.

Harry Stebbings:

Yeah, no, I’m totally with you. I love Loom and actually, I find with founders today, some do an incredible job presenting their deck through Loom, which is an incredibly effective way of doing it. I do want to move though into my favorite, which is the quickfire round. So I say a short statement and then you give me your immediate thoughts, about 60 seconds or less per one. How does that sound?

Tamar Yehoshua:

Ready.

Harry Stebbings:

Okay. So what’s the biggest challenge of your role with Slack today?

Tamar Yehoshua:

I think my biggest challenge is generic and it’s the same one that everyone is facing. How do you maintain a pace of execution during a global pandemic while avoiding burnout?

Harry Stebbings:

What would you most like to change about the world of SaaS?

Tamar Yehoshua:

So I talked a little bit about this proliferation of tools. I think there is an enormous proliferation of SaaS tools, which is very good for enterprises and for knowledge workers, but I’d like to see them work together better and make sure that they integrate and they think of the holistic experience that a user has of using all of their tools together.

Harry Stebbings:

Tough one here. What moment in your life has really changed the way that you think?

Tamar Yehoshua:

That really is a tough one. If I think back to when I was in high school and I was deciding where to go to college, I was accepted to a couple of colleges and I thought this was the most monumental thing in my life, deciding where to go to college. Every night at dinner, I would talk about it and my father was getting super bored hearing about this every night, and he says to me, it doesn’t matter. You’re going to get a good education no matter where you go. It’s what you put into it. It’s not the college, and then he says to me something that I’ve used to guide my decisions ever since, and it’s a piece of advice that I give people all the time. He said, there’s no such thing as a right decision. You make a decision right.

Harry Stebbings:

Hm. I love that one. That’s a really good one. I haven’t heard that before either, after as many episodes as I’ve done, that’s a rare thing on a piece of advice so I absolutely love that. Tell me, final one, where do you see Slack in the next five years? Paint that picture for me.

Tamar Yehoshua:

I think Slack is going to transform business communication and I think most business communication will be done on Slack both internally and externally. You’re going to be working with all your trusted partners on Slack. Email’s never going away, but it’s going to become used for one-offs for people you don’t know very well, people you’re just meeting and of course, as a spam folder, and I think the Slack platform will also be used as a layer to get more value out of all of the other SaaS tools that you have.

Harry Stebbings:

As I said at the beginning, I heard so many great things from Paul and from April that I was so looking forward to this one, and it’s been such a joy to have you on so thank you so much for joining me today.

Tamar Yehoshua:

Thank you so much for having me.

Harry Stebbings:

I mean, what an incredible leader and person, really. I love that piece of advice from Tamar’s father. That really, really did sit with me. So thank you so much to Tamar for joining me on the show today. If you’d like to see more from us behind the scenes, you can on Instagram at Hstebbings 1996 with two Bs. 

Harry Stebbings:

As always, I so appreciate all your support and I can’t wait to bring you a fantastic episode next week.

 

Published on December 23, 2020

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